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List of MSc thesis topics

Renewable energy

Subject : Energy supply with pv- systems for the hinterland.

Student:

Keywords : Energy policy, Sustainable development, Management
Supervisors :
Co-supervisors:
Tutor : C.Wijngaarde MSc
Description of the research

1. Problem description:
Energy supply for the villages in the hinterland is done mainly threw generators driven by a diesel engine. These generators are only operational during the hours 6 till 10 pm. Due to the high cost of transport and diesel and environmental issues, this form of mainly energy supply is not advisable.

2. Objective(s):
Co-generation of energy supply 24 hours a day through Photovoltaic systems (PV-systems) with a sustainable character.

3. Study area(s):
Suriname

4. Method(s):
A. Literature study:
- Survey of energy supply and policy for the hinterland of Suriname
- Investigation of international incentive policy for renewable energy
B. Field work:
- Determination of the different PV power schemes for the villages and their financial/economic feasibility
- Determination of a sustainable management structure for the generation and co-generation with PV-systems

Ad. A: Information on solar irradiation and working principle of pv- systems are available at the department thanks to the donation of VLIR cooperation. Ad. B: Fieldtrip to a few close by villages (indigenous and maroon) is necessary for determine what is going on in the villages.

5. Expectation(s):
- The final thesis will gain us a clear insight into the feasibility of supplying energy in villages in the hinterland threw renewable energy especially photovoltaic systems.
- The final thesis can be used as a green paper by the government

6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
- Wind speed measurement at Nickerie and Galibi
- Solar energy (PV) measurement in Suriname
- Smartgrid research in Suriname

7. Link to SMNR courses:
Energy Management, Renewable Energy Systems, Electrical Energy Technology, Economy and valuation of natural Resources, Sustainable Development, Project Management

 

Subject : The impact of climate change on the wind energy resource of Suriname using Regional Climate Model (RCM) simulations

Student: A. Ramsingh
Keywords : Climatology, Modeling, Statistics, Wind
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Tutor : A. Kalpoe MSc

Description of the research

1. Problem description:
Greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) are having a significant effect on the Earth's climate. Climate models predict that global temperatures will rise with about 1.5 to 4.5 oC by 2100 depending on the amounts of GHGs emitted and the sensitivity of the climate system. Increasing temperatures will lead to changes in the wind climatology. There is considerable interest in renewable energy resources in Suriname in order to reduce or/and replace diesel generated energy. However, many persons feel that, at least along the coast of Suriname, we should have enough wind power that can be utilized for wind energy power.

2. Objective(s):
To evaluate future wind energy resources in Suriname by simulating the wind climatology at high resolution using the method of regional climate modeling.

3. Study area(s):
The coastal area of Suriname: locations Galibi, Nickerie, Paramaribo.

4. Method(s):
Statistical methods will be used to analyze wind data. PRECIS can be used to analyze and display data. Output data of PRECIS is also available.
Historical meteorological data is available; ArcView/ArcGIS, PRECIS, R, Matlab and other relevant software are available. GIS data of the study area is available. Satellite images can be provided.

5. Expectation(s):
Insight is gained in:
- the ability of PRECIS to accurately simulate the wind climatology of Suriname
- to simulate the future wind climate for different GHG emission scenarios and to determine if (a) future climate projections of the RCM show substantial changes when compared with the past and (b) whether the changes are significant
- the student has gained knowledge in statistical methods and modeling climate impacts on wind

  

Subject : Development of future changes in wind and solar radiation for renewable energy applications in Suriname derived from the GCMs and RGMs
Student:
Keywords : Climatology, Energy management, Renewable energy, Modeling, Statistics.
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor :
Tutor: A. Kalpoe MSc
Description of the research
1. Problem description:
According to the IPCC (2007), global climate change has shown to cause significant impacts on different sectors in the world such as water resources, energy sources, and biodiversity. Recent studies in Suriname (2008) with global circulation models (GCMs) has shown that the outputs are to coarse (150-350 km) to study the impacts of climate change in Suriname on regional scale. Regional climate models (RGMs) such as Precis, a high resolution model, takes into account most of the disadvantages of GCMs. However, there is insufficient experience in the use of PRECIS in the world and it is also not known if the model can be representative for climate change studies in Suriname. But climate modeling is also a very powerful tool nowadays for impact studies.
2. Objective(s):
To analyses the changes and the distribution of (daily/monthly) wind speed and solar radiation and other climate variables (relevant for renewable energy) in Suriname in the past (1961-1990) and in a future (2050, 2100) climate under the IPCC SRES A2 and B2 emissions scenarios using GCM and RCM models
3. Study area(s):
Suriname (coastal area and interior0
4. Method(s):
GIS data of this area is available; historical hydrological and meteorological data is available; PC's available in UCC-Room 3 or the Dept. Electrical Engineering. The Precis model can only be used via UCC or Dept. Infrastructure.GCM model results can be obtained from MAGIC/SCHENGEN model or other internet sources.
5. Expectation(s):
- Insight is gained in climate modeling with GCMs and RGMs (high resolution climate models) for wind and solar radiation and other relevant climate variables for renewable energy purposes
- Insight is gained in the value of regional climate modeling using 25/50 km resolution
- Insight is gained in future profiles for wind and solar radiation and other relevant climate variables for renewable energy purposes
- Insight is gained in future development of renewable energy resources such as wind and solar energy in Suriname
- comparison is made between GCM and RGM results
6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
This research is part of the climate modeling research in the Department of Infrastructure of the Faculty of Technology and renewable energy research in the department Electrical engineering.
7. Link to SMNR courses:
Climatology and hydrology; Applied statistics and data modeling; Renewable energy; Energy management; Geostatistics.

 

Land and watermanagement

Subject : Analysis and modeling of land-use and land-cover change in the Upper Suriname river basin

Student:
Keywords : GIS, Land use, Modeling, Remote Sensing, Statistics
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor :
Description of the research

1. Problem description:
The increase in population, increase in mining activities, projected infrastructure, increase in houses and agriculture land in the Upper Suriname river basin, will change the current land use and land cover. Land-use change models are probably the most concise and useful way to explore the dynamics and drivers of land-use/land-cover change and to inform policies affecting such change. IDRISI (Land Change Modeler) provides a range of powerful tools for the exploration of our rapidly changing world e.g. for modeling land cover change. For future planning purposes, it is important to predict land use and land cover changes and the impacts in the Upper Suriname river basin by 2050 and 2100.

2. Objective(s):
Analysis and modeling land use and land cover change (LUCC) in a fast rural growing basin between 1950 and 2013 using remotely sensed data and IDRISI.

3. Study area(s):
Upper Suriname river basin, Suriname

4. Method(s):
Historical physical data is available; ArcGIS, Idrisi and other relevant software are available. GIS data of the study area is available. Satellite images are provided; images can also be obtained from the internet, GLIS and CBL. Statistical methods (R model or using IDRISI) will be used to analyze data and make predictions.

5. Expectation(s):
Insight is gained in:
- understand the historical trends of land use change in the study area
- baseline mapping and scenario modeling
- estimating the magnitude of land use changes that have been taken place from 1950 to 2013
- producing land use/cover maps for the different cases
- estimating land use/cover change dynamics for year 2050 and 2100

Subject : Differences in gap size and distribution between RIL logged and conventional logged plots, and the effect on vegetation structure and composition.

Student:
Keywords : Forestry, GIS, mapping
Supervisor : Prof. R. de Wulf
Tutor : G. Landburg MSc
Description of the research

1. Problem description:
Reduced impact logging (RIL) has been advocated as the sustainable alternative to conventional logging (CL), but limited evidence exists about the effect of both logging systems on the forest ecosystem. During CL timber is being harvested without any form of planning to minimize negative impact on the forest ecosystem. RIL on the other hand involves a detailed planning for inventory, skid trails and felling techniques. These measures in RIL are expected to result in minimal damage to and changes in the remaining stand and soils and to maintain critical ecological processes (Castro-Arellan et al., 2009). In practice this is not always the case. While studies showed that parameters as damage to the remaining stand and canopy gap fraction were less when RIL was implemented than when CL was implemented (Bicknell and Peres 2010; Johns et al. 1996), other studies revealed that even in the case of the RIL technique implemented, the damage to the remaining stand was above acceptable limits (Jackson et al. 2002). The distribution and density of gaps will determine the effect of the logging activities on the vegetation structure and composition in and around the gap. In relation to the availability of commercial species, this may be important factor.

2. Objective(s):
The objective of this research is to determine the difference in gap size and distribution when either RIL or CL is applied and the effect on vegetation structure and composition.

3. Study area(s) and data:
The study will be conducted at Suma Lumber. The following data needs to be gathered:
- Gap size and gap distribution in RIL and CL plots
- Vegetation structure and composition in and around gaps in RIL and CL plots

4. Method(s):
- Two CL and three RIL units will be selected
- In each unit three plots of 100 x 100 will be set up for the study
- In each 100 x 100 plots, gaps will be mapped
- Vegetation structure and composition will be gathered in the gap and in a diameter of 2-5 meter around the gap
- Data on vegetation structure and composition will also be gathered in 10x10 m plots in areas with no gaps
- Data analysis and writing of report

5. Expectation(s):
- The student is expected to participate actively in field activities
- The student is expected to think critically about the proposed field design and come up with better alternatives
- The student is expected to write a report answering the research question stated in the proposal

 

Subject : Modeling REDD in the Upper Suriname river basin

Student:
Keywords : GIS, Land use, Modeling, Remote Sensing, Statistics
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor :
Description of the research

1. Problem description:
Forests play a major role in the sequestration of carbon, and the conservation of tropical forests, in particular, yields the greatest potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The increase in population, increase in mining activities, projected infrastructure, increase in houses and agriculture land in the Upper Suriname river basin, will change the current land use and land cover. Land-use change models are probably the most concise and useful way to explore the dynamics and drivers of land-use/land-cover change and to inform policies affecting such change. IDRISI (Land Change Modeler) provides a range of powerful tools for the exploration of our rapidly changing world e.g. for modeling land cover change. For future planning purposes, it is important to predict land use and land cover changes and the impacts in the Upper Suriname river basin by 2050 and 2100.

2. Objective(s):
Modeling REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation Baselines) in the Upper Suriname river basin between 1950 and 2013, using remotely sensed data and IDRISI's Land Change Modeler.

3. Study area(s):
Upper Suriname river basin, Suriname

4. Method(s):
Historical physical data is available; ArcGIS, Idrisi and other relevant software are available. GIS data of the study area is available. Satellite images are provided; images can also be obtained from the internet, GLIS and CBL. Statistical methods (R model or using IDRISI) will be used to analyze data and make predictions.

5. Expectation(s):
Insight is gained in:
- understand the historical trends of land use change in the study area
- identify the land use and land cover transitions
- baseline mapping and scenario modeling
- estimating the magnitude of land use changes that have been taken place from 1950 to 2013
- producing land use/cover maps for the different cases
- estimating future land use/cover change dynamics for year 2050 and 2100

 

Subject : Predicting the impact of climate change to the Kabalebo/Upper Suriname/Tapanahony river basin in Suriname on the
hydro-power potential using the SWAT model

Student:
Keywords : GIS, Hydrology, Modeling, Statistics
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor :
Description of the research

1. Problem description:
SWAT is the acronym for Soil and Water Assessment Tool, a river basin, or watershed, scale model developed by Dr. Jeff Arnold for the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS). SWAT was developed to predict the impact of land management practices on water, sediment and agricultural chemical yields in large complex watersheds with varying soils, land use and management conditions over long periods of time. This topic allows to familiarize oneself with the SWAT model and to develop an extensive knowledge of this model.

2. Objective(s):
- Testing the SWAT model as a tool for hydrological modeling of large river basins
- Testing SWAT model as a tool for hydrological modeling, data processing and climate change input to models

3. Study area(s):
Kabalebo river basin / Tapanahony river basin / Upper Suriname river basin.

4. Method(s):
Statistical methods will be used to analyze wind data. PRECIS can be used to analyze and display data. Output data of PRECIS is also available.
Historical physical, hydrological and meteorological data are available; ArcView/ArcGIS, PRECIS, R-model and other relevant software are available. GIS data of the study are is available. Satellite images can be provided. SWAT model available from http://swatmodel.tamu.edu/

5. Expectation(s):
The student has gained knowledge in hydrological modeling, climate modeling, GIS techniques, scenario development.

 

Subject : Testing a TOPMODEL or Rhydro as a tool for hydrological modeling

Student:
Keywords : GIS, Hydrology, Modeling, Statistics
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Description of the research

1. Problem description:
Dr. Wouter Buytaert programmed the hydrological model TOPMODEL as an R extension and developed several derivations of the original model. He made this model available on a website. In addition, R is documented, including downloads, and installation and a great choice of manuals can be found on the R website. R has a great potential for pre- en post processing of the data (including uncertainty analysis and statistics). This topic allows to familiarize oneself with the open source approach and to develop an extensive knowledge of the very powerful package R. [from IUPWARE]

2. Objective(s):
- Testing a TOPMODEL (version in R) as a tool for hydrological modeling
- Testing Rhydro (version in R) as a tool for hydrological modeling, data processing and climate change input to models

3. Study area(s):
Kabalebo river basin or Tapanahony river basin or Upper Suriname river basin.

4. Method(s):
Statistical methods will be used to analyze wind data. PRECIS can be used to analyze and display data. Output data of PRECIS is also available.
Historical physical, hydrological and meteorological data are available; ArcView/ArcGIS, PRECIS, R-model and other relevant software are available. GIS data of the study are is available. Satellite images can be provided.

5. Expectation(s):
The student has gained knowledge in hydrological modeling, climate modeling, GIS techniques, scenario development.

  

Subject : Analysis and modeling of land-use and land-cover change in the Upper Suriname river basin

Student:
Keywords : GIS, Land use, Modeling, Remote Sensing, Statistics
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor :
Description of the research

1. Problem description:
The increase in population, increase in mining activities, projected infrastructure, increase in houses and agriculture land in the Upper Suriname river basin, will change the current land use and land cover. Land-use change models are probably the most concise and useful way to explore the dynamics and drivers of land-use/land-cover change and to inform policies affecting such change. IDRISI (Land Change Modeler) provides a range of powerful tools for the exploration of our rapidly changing world e.g. for modeling land cover change. For future planning purposes, it is important to predict land use and land cover changes and the impacts in the Upper Suriname river basin by 2050 and 2100.

2. Objective(s):
Analysis and modeling land use and land cover change (LUCC) in a fast rural growing basin between 1950 and 2013 using remotely sensed data and IDRISI.

3. Study area(s):
Upper Suriname river basin, Suriname

4. Method(s):
Historical physical data is available; ArcGIS, Idrisi and other relevant software are available. GIS data of the study area is available. Satellite images are provided; images can also be obtained from the internet, GLIS and CBL. Statistical methods (R model or using IDRISI) will be used to analyze data and make predictions. Typical forest impact models are: JABOWA

5. Expectation(s):
Insight is gained in:
- understand the historical trends of land use change in the study area
- baseline mapping and scenario modeling
- estimating the magnitude of land use changes that have been taken place from 1950 to 2013
- producing land use/cover maps for the different cases
- estimating land use/cover change dynamics for year 2050 and 2100

 

Subject : Analysis and modeling of land-use and land-cover change in district Nickerie

Student: Jiawan, M.

Keywords : GIS, Land use, Modeling, Remote Sensing, Statistics
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor :
Description of the research

1. Problem description:
The increase in population, increase in infrastructure, increase in houses and agriculture land in districts Commwijne/Nickerie, will change the current land use and land cover. Land-use change models are probably the most concise and useful way to explore the dynamics and drivers of land-use/land-cover change and to inform policies affecting such change. IDRISI (Land Change Modeler) provides a range of powerful tools for the exploration of our rapidly changing world e.g. for modeling land cover change. For future planning purposes, it is important to predict land use and land cover changes and the impacts in district Nickerie by 2050 and 2100.

2. Objective(s):
Analysis and modeling land use and land cover change (LUCC) in a fast urban growing region between 1950 and 2013 using remotely sensed data and IDRISI.

3. Study area(s):
District Nickerie, Suriname

4. Method(s):
Historical physical data is available; ArcGIS, Idrisi and other relevant software are available. GIS data of the study area is available. Satellite images are provided; images can also be obtained from the internet, GLIS and CBL. Statistical methods (R model or using IDRISI) will be used to analyze data and make predictions.

5. Expectation(s):
Insight is gained in:
- understand the historical trends of land use change in the study area
- baseline mapping and scenario modeling
- estimating the magnitude of land use changes that have been taken place in districts Nickerie from 1950 to 2013
- producing land use/cover maps for the different cases
- estimating land use/cover change dynamics for year 2050 and 2100

 

Subject : Analysis and modeling of land-use and land-cover change in district Commewijne

Student: Sairas, C.

Keywords : GIS, Land use, Modeling, Remote Sensing, Statistics
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor :
Description of the research

1. Problem description:
The increase in population, increase in infrastructure, increase in houses and agriculture land in districts Commwijne/Nickerie, will change the current land use and land cover. Land-use change models are probably the most concise and useful way to explore the dynamics and drivers of land-use/land-cover change and to inform policies affecting such change. IDRISI (Land Change Modeler) provides a range of powerful tools for the exploration of our rapidly changing world e.g. for modeling land cover change. For future planning purposes, it is important to predict land use and land cover changes and the impacts in district Nickerie by 2050 and 2100.

2. Objective(s):
Analysis and modeling land use and land cover change (LUCC) in a fast urban growing region between 1950 and 2013 using remotely sensed data and IDRISI.

3. Study area(s):
District Nickerie, Suriname

4. Method(s):
Historical physical data is available; ArcGIS, Idrisi and other relevant software are available. GIS data of the study area is available. Satellite images are provided; images can also be obtained from the internet, GLIS and CBL. Statistical methods (R model or using IDRISI) will be used to analyze data and make predictions.

5. Expectation(s):
Insight is gained in:
- understand the historical trends of land use change in the study area
- baseline mapping and scenario modeling
- estimating the magnitude of land use changes that have been taken place in districts Nickerie from 1950 to 2013
- producing land use/cover maps for the different cases
- estimating land use/cover change dynamics for year 2050 and 2100

 

Subject : Modeling the impact of climate change on the rice sector in district Nickerie, Suriname

Student:
Keywords : Agriculture, Climate change, Modeling, Statistics
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor :
Description of the research

1. Problem description:
District Nickerie in north-west Suriname is responsible for the production of rice and bananas for local consumption, but also for the export. High export standards are therefore set for the quality of these products. Sufficient freshwater is one of the main drivers to realize this. Climate change may change the future of rice production in this district.

2. Objective(s):
To model the impact of climate change on the rice production in district Nickerie by 2030 and 2050, based on the current water resources systems.

3. Study area(s):
District Nickerie, Suriname

4. Method(s):
GIS data of this area is available; historical physical, hydrological and meteorological data is available; Idrisi, Arcview/ArcGIS software are available. PRECIS data (historical and future data) is available. Up to date satellite images for processing in Idrisi can be provided by VLIR-AdeKUS-Project 4. Other models can be requested e.g. WEAP model, Rainbow, ETo, Budget. Typical impact crop models are: WOFOST 7.1.2 (DSSAT 4.5), Aqua Crop 3.1 +

5. Expectation(s):
- A model is developed to study the impact of climate change on agriculture sector (rice)
- Insight is gained in modeling physical and non physical systems (water resources systems, land systems, hydro-climatological time series)
- Insight is gained in modeling climate impact on the rice sector (modeling, formulating scenarios, irrigation and hydrology)
- Insight is gained in the impact of climate change on the rice sector in district Nickerie

Subject : Detection and monitoring of small scale gold mining areas in Suriname

Student: Ramlal, A.
Keywords : tropical rainforest mapping, monitoring, small scale gold mining, remote sensing, GIS
Supervisor : Prof. Robert De Wulf (UGent, Belgium)

Co-supervisor : Dr. Frieke Vancoillie (UGent, Belgium)
Tutor : Virginia Atmopawiro (AdeKUS)
Student:

Description of the research
1. Problem description:
Illegal gold mining activities in the interior is a pressing issue in Suriname. It poses a considerable threat for the sustainable use of our natural resources. Remote Sensing and GIS techniques offer ways to monitor forest resources and to detect disturbance from anthropogenic origin, such as illegal gold mining.

2. Objective(s):
The main objective of this research is to map and quantify small scale gold mining areas in the tropical forest to support sustainable management of Suriname's forest resources.

3. Study area(s): an area at the southeastern border of Suriname known as Maripasula

4. Method(s):
(include field and laboratory experiments, equipment and software to be used which have been bought by VLIR or is available in the Lab, and other operational costs)
• Literature study and review
• Remote sensing data analysis i.e. image classification & accuracy assessment (ENVI, eCognition, IDRISI Selva)
• Discriminate illegal areas from legal gold mining areas using GIS data layers in ArcGIS

5. Expectation(s):
• Reliable, robust and accurate method to delineate and quantify small scale gold mining in the tropical rainforest
• Reliable method to distinguish illegal gold mining areas from the legal areas
• Reliable and accurate method to monitor small scale gold mining activities

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Subject : Modeling the impact of land use changes on the hydrological regime in the Upper Suriname river basin

Student: Mannoe, R.
Keywords : GIS, Hydrology, Land use, Modeling, Statistics
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor : Ass. Prof. P. Willems
(if applicable)

Description of the research

1. Problem description:
In the recent years, extreme climate events have shown to cause significant floods and droughts in the Upper-Suriname river basin. Increased "slash and burn" activities for agriculture purposes, tourist activities, or accommodation in this area are of concern. GIS based land use and GIS based hydrologic modeling are powerful tools in assessing the future impact of the hydrology of river basins due to changes in land cover.

2. Objective(s):
To model the impact of changes in land cover (forest changes) on the monthly river flows in the Upper Suriname river basin) by 2050.

3. Study area(s):
The Upper-Suriname river basin (7,780 km2), Suriname

4. Method(s):
GIS data of this area is available; historical physical, hydrological and meteorological data is available; ArcView, Idrisi, WetSpa and Interpolatie software is available, PC's available in UCC-Room 3 or at the Dept. Infrastructure. Up to date satellite images for processing in Idrisi can be provided by VLIR-AdeKUS-Project 4.

5. Expectation(s):
- Insight is gained in the impact of changes of land cover on the river flows in the Upper Suriname river basin
- The student has gained knowledge in hydrological modeling, GIS techniques, scenario development

6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
This research is part of the hydrological modeling and climate modeling research in the Department of Infrastructure of the Faculty of Technology.

7. Link to SMNR courses:
Climatology and hydrology; Advanced GIS; Remote sensing; Land use development and management.


Subject : Modeling the impact of climate change on the hydrological regime of the Kabalebo river basin

Student: P. Donk
Keywords : Climatology, GIS, Hydrology, Modeling, Statistics, Water resources
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor : Ass. Prof. P. Willems
(if applicable)

Description of the research

1. Problem description:
In the recent years, extreme climate events have shown to cause significant floods and droughts in different river basins in Suriname. This has resulted in different economic losses for local communities and in some cases for the economy of Suriname. The drought in 2004/2005 has caused significantly impact on hydropower generation from the Afobakka lake and extra diesel engines were made operational to supply sufficient energy to industries and households in Paramaribo. In the Kabalebo river basin a new hydropower will be developed. GIS based hydrologic modeling is a powerful tool in assessing the future impact of the hydrology of river basins due to changes in climate change.

2. Objective(s):
a. To model the impact of climate change on the monthly river flows in the Kabalebo river basin by 2050 and 2100.
b. To model the effect of these plans on the statistics of water availability

3. Study area(s):
Kabalebo river basin, Suriname

4. Method(s):
GIS data of this area is available; historical physical, hydrological and meteorological data is available; ArcView, Idrisi, hydrological model (KUL) or the WetSpa model, and interpolation software is available, PC's available in UCC-Room 3 or the Dept. Infrastructure. The Precis model can only be used via UCC or Dept. Infrastructure.

5. Expectation(s):
- Insight is gained in the impact of climate change on the water balance and river flows in the Kabalebo river basin
- The student has gained knowledge in hydrological modeling, climate modeling, GIS techniques, scenario development

6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
This research is part of the hydrological modeling and climate modeling research in the Department of Infrastructure of the Faculty of Technology.

7. Link to SMNR courses:
Climatology and hydrology; Advanced GIS; Remote sensing; Water resources management.


Subject : Modeling the impact of climate change on the hydrological regime of the Tapanahony river basin

Student: Badal, R.
Keywords : Climatology, GIS, Hydrology, Modeling, Statistics, Water resources
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor : Ass. Prof. P. Willems
(if applicable)

Description of the research

1. Problem description:
In the recent years, extreme climate events have shown to cause significant floods and droughts in different river basins in Suriname. This has resulted in different economic losses for local communities and in some cases for the economy of Suriname. The drought in 2004/2005 has caused significantly impact on hydropower generation from the Afobakka lake and extra diesel engines were made operational to supply sufficient energy to industries and households in Paramaribo. Currently plans are made to use water from the Tapanahony river basin to increase water supply to the Afobakka lake. GIS based hydrologic modeling is a powerful tool in assessing the future impact of the hydrology of river basins due to changes in climate change.

2. Objective(s):
a. To model the impact of climate change on the monthly river flows in the Tapanahony river basin by 2050 and 2100.
b. To model the effect of these plans on the statistics of water availability

3. Study area(s):
Tapanahony river basin, Suriname

4. Method(s):
GIS data of this area is available; historical physical, hydrological and meteorological data is available; ArcView, Idrisi, hydrological model (KUL) or the WetSpa model and interpolation software is available, PC's available in UCC-Room 3 or the Dept. Infrastructure. The Precis model can only be used via UCC or Dept. Infrastructure.

5. Expectation(s):
- Insight is gained in the impact of climate change on the water balance and river flows in the Tapanahony river basin
- The student has gained knowledge in hydrological modeling, climate modeling, GIS techniques, scenario development

6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
This research is part of the hydrological modeling and climate modeling research in the Department of Infrastructure of the Faculty of Technology.

7. Link to SMNR courses:
Climatology and hydrology; Advanced GIS; Remote sensing; Water resources management.

Subject : Future changes in temperature, precipitation, evaporation/evapotranspiration and river discharges in Suriname derived from the GCMs and RGMs

Student: R. Ramjiawan

Keywords : Climatology, Hydrology, Modeling, Statistics,
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor : Prof. dr. P. Willems
(if applicable)

Description of the research

1. Problem description:
According to the IPCC (2007), global climate change has shown to cause significant impacts on different sectors in the world such as water resources, agriculture, fishery, health and biodiversity. Recent studies in Suriname (2008) with global circulation models (GCMs) has shown that the outputs are to coarse (150-350 km) to study the impacts of climate change in Suriname on regional scale. Regional climate models (RGMs) such as Precis, a high resolution model, takes into account most of the disadvantages of GCMs. However, there is insufficient experience in the use of PRECIS in the world and it is also not known if the model can be representative for climate change studies in Suriname. But climate modeling is also a very powerful tool nowadays for impact studies.

2. Objective(s):
To analyses the changes and the distribution of (daily/monthly) temperature, precipitation, evaporation and river discharges in Suriname in the past (1961-1990) and in a future (2050, 2100) climate under the IPCC SRES A2 and B2 emissions scenarios.

3. Study area(s):
Suriname, case study Paramaribo.

4. Method(s):
GIS data of this area is available; historical hydrological and meteorological data is available; PC's available in UCC-Room 3 or the Dept. Infrastructure. The Precis model can only be used via UCC or Dept. Infrastructure.GCM model results can be obtained from MAGIC/SCHENGEN model or international resources.

5. Expectation(s):
- Insight is gained in climate modeling with GCMs and RGMs (high resolution climate models)
- Insight is gained in the value of regional climate modeling using 25/50 km resolution

- comparison is made between GCM and RGM results

6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
This research is part of the climate modeling research in the Department of Infrastructure of the Faculty of Technology.

7. Link to SMNR courses:
Climatology and hydrology; Advanced engineering mathematics; Applied statistics and data modeling.

 

Subject : Modeling the impact of climate change on the hydrological regime of the Kabalebo river basin using the WetSpa model and GIS
Student: Gangaram Panday, S.

Keywords : Climatology, GIS, Hydrology, Modeling, Statistics, Water resources
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor : Ass. Prof. P. Willems

Description of the research
1. Problem description:
In the recent years, extreme climate events have shown to cause significant floods and droughts in different river basins in Suriname. This has resulted in different economic losses for local communities and in some cases for the economy of Suriname. The drought in 2004/2005 has caused significantly impact on hydropower generation from the Afobakka lake and extra diesel engines were made operational to supply sufficient energy to industries and households in Paramaribo. In the Kabalebo river basin a new hydropower will be developed. GIS based hydrologic modeling is a powerful tool in assessing the future impact of the hydrology of river basins due to changes in climate change.
2. Objective(s):
a. To model the impact of climate change on the monthly river flows in the Kabalebo river basin by 2050 and 2100.
b. To model the effect of these plans on the statistics of water availability
3. Study area(s):
Kabalebo river basin, Suriname
4. Method(s):
GIS data of this area is available; historical physical, hydrological and meteorological data is available; ArcView, the WetSpa model, and ArcGIS software are available, PC's available in UCC-Room 3 or the Dept. Infrastructure. The Precis model can only be used via UCC or Dept. Infrastructure.
5. Expectation(s):
- Insight is gained in the impact of climate change on the water balance and river flows in the Kabalebo river basin
- The student has gained knowledge in hydrological modeling, climate modeling, GIS techniques, scenario development and statistics
6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
This research is part of the hydrological modeling and climate modeling research in the Department of Infrastructure of the Faculty of Technology.
7. Link to SMNR courses:
Climatology and hydrology; Advanced GIS; Water resources management; Applied statistics and data modeling

 

Subject : Modeling the impact of climate change on the hydrological regime of the Tapanahony river basin using the WetSpa model and GIS
Student: Badal, R.
Keywords : Climatology, GIS, Hydrology, Modeling, Statistics, Water resources
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.
Co-supervisor :

Description of the research
1. Problem description:
In the recent years, extreme climate events have shown to cause significant floods and droughts in different river basins in Suriname. This has resulted in different economic losses for local communities and in some cases for the economy of Suriname. The drought in 2004/2005 has caused significantly impact on hydropower generation from the Afobakka lake and extra diesel engines were made operational to supply sufficient energy to industries and households in Paramaribo. In the Tapanahony river basin a new hydropower will be developed. GIS based hydrologic modeling is a powerful tool in assessing the future impact of the hydrology of river basins due to changes in climate change.
2. Objective(s):
a. To model the impact of climate change on the monthly river flows in the Tapanahony river basin by 2050 and 2100.
b. To model the effect of these plans on the statistics of water availability
3. Study area(s):
Tapanahony river basin, Suriname
4. Method(s):
GIS data of this area is available; historical physical, hydrological and meteorological data is available; ArcView, the WetSpa model, and ArcGIS software are available, PC's available in UCC-Room 3 or the Dept. Infrastructure. The Precis model can only be used via UCC or Dept. Infrastructure.
5. Expectation(s):
- Insight is gained in the impact of climate change on the water balance and river flows in the Tapanahony river basin
- The student has gained knowledge in hydrological modeling, climate modeling, GIS techniques, scenario development and statistics
6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
This research is part of the hydrological modeling and climate modeling research in the Department of Infrastructure of the Faculty of Technology.
7. Link to SMNR courses:
Climatology and hydrology; Advanced GIS; Water resources management; Applied statistics and data modeling

 

Subject : Modeling erosion of the Upper Suriname river basin due to land use changes (e.g. climate change, gold mining activities) using the RUSLE model and ArcGIS
Student: Mackintosh, A.
Keywords : GIS, Land use, Modeling, Statistics
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.

Description of the research
1. Problem description:
In the recent years, the amount of changes in land use in the Upper Suriname river basin has increased. Removal of primary forest due to slash and burn activities, the long term change in land use due to increasing temperatures (global climate change), will increase the amount of sediments in the Upper Suriname river leading to increased sedimentation of the Prof. Van Blommenstein reservoir. Erosion modeling is a powerful tool in estimating erosion of large river basins when also poor data is available of the basin, but also for estimating the future impact of land use changes on erosion.
2. Objective(s):
a. To apply the RUSLE and other GIS based erosion models for the Upper Suriname river basin
b. To model the impact of the erosion regime by 2050 and 2100 e.g. due to temperature changes => land use changes, human activities => gold mining etc )
b. To model the effect of the erosion of reservoir management
3. Study area(s):
Upper Suriname river basin, Suriname
4. Method(s):
GIS data of this area is available; historical physical, hydrological and meteorological data is available; ArcView, RUSLE model (online) and other erosion models via internet sources, and ArcGIS software are available, PC's available in UCC-Room 3 or the Dept. Infrastructure. Outputs of GCMs and RCMs will be provided (e.g. temperature changes, evapotranspiration changes)
5. Expectation(s):
- Insight is gained in setting up an erosion model in ArcGIS/ArcView and modeling erosion of a river basin
- Insight is gained in the impact of land use changes on the erosion regime and reservoir management
- The student has gained knowledge in erosion , GIS techniques, scenario development and statistics
6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
This research is part of the hydrological modeling and climate modeling research in the Department of Infrastructure of the Faculty of Technology.
7. Link to SMNR courses:
Land use development and management; Advanced GIS; Applied statistics and data modeling; Water resources management (reservoir management)


Subject : Sensitivity analysis in hydrological modeling using different digital elevation model resolutions and qualities and using the WetSpa model and GIS
Student:
Keywords : Climatology, GIS, Hydrology, Modeling, Statistics, Water resources
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.

Description of the research
1. Problem description:
Digital elevation models are a powerful input in GIS based modeling e.g. hydrologic modeling, land use modeling, urban planning. Depending on the application and available sources, a certain quality and/or resolution DEM is required. For hydrologic modeling this is also very important.
2. Objective(s):
a. To model the hydrological regime of the Upper Suriname river basin using different resolution DEMs (200m, 100m, 50m, 25m) and different quality DEMs (direct derived DEM, more interpolated DEM etc)
b. To analyze the water balance
3. Study area(s):
Upper Suriname river basin, Suriname
4. Method(s):
GIS data of this area is available; historical physical, hydrological and meteorological data is available; ArcView, the WetSpa model, and ArcGIS software are available, PC's available in UCC-Room 3 or the Dept. Infrastructure.
5. Expectation(s):
- Insight is gained in the hydrologic modeling and digital elevation modeling of a large river basin
- The student has gained knowledge in hydrological modeling, GIS techniques, scenario development and statistics
6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
This research is part of the hydrological modeling and climate modeling research in the Department of Infrastructure of the Faculty of Technology.
7. Link to SMNR courses:
Advanced GIS; Water resources management; Applied statistics and data modeling

 

Subject : Comparison of generated drainage networks of large river basins using different available topographic data sets
Student: R. Sardjoe

Keywords : GIS, Hydrology, Modeling, Statistics
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Nurmohamed R. Ph.D.

Description of the research
1. Problem description:
Digital elevation models are a powerful input in GIS based modeling e.g. hydrologic modeling, land use modeling, urban planning. There are a few topographic data sets nowadays available on public domain (SRTM, USGS, NGDC) for free that can be used for above purposes. However their application for large river basins in Suriname is not known. For hydrologic modeling a good DEM is required, especially if data in Suriname is not available.
2. Objective(s):
a. To extract drainage networks of the different obtained DEMs for large river basins in Suriname and compare them with the actual river network using ArcGIS (TOPO model) and the WetSpa (hydrological) model.
b. To compare and analyze the drainage networks.
3. Study area(s):
Upper Suriname river basin, Tapanahony river basin, Kabalebo river basin, Suriname
4. Method(s):
GIS data of this area is available; digital elevation and river network data is available (NARENA, Celos); ArcView and ArcGIS software are available, PC's available in UCC-Room 3 or the Dept. Infrastructure.
5. Expectation(s):
- Insight is gained in the digital elevation modeling of a large river basin, and generating drainage networks
6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
This research is part of the hydrological modeling research in the Department of Infrastructure of the Faculty of Technology.
7. Link to SMNR courses:
Advanced GIS; Water resources management; Applied statistics and data modeling

 

Biodiversity

Subject : Seabob shrimp trawling in Suriname: spatio-temporal fishery patterns in relation to population characteristics
Formulating advice for an ecosystem-based fisheries management
Student: C. Landburg
Keywords : Shrimp, Suriname, GIS

Supervisor : Prof. J. Mol
Co-supervisor : Dr. G. Middendorf
Tutors : T. Willems

Description of the research
1. Problem description:
In Suriname, shrimp trawling has been an important livelihood ever since the first government-owned shrimp trawlers started operating in 1958 (Netherlands_Institute_for_Sound_and_Vision 1958). However, there are increasing concerns about the sustainability of this sector (Mahabier 2006). A major reason for these concerns is that catches are dropping (Oosterum 2011). Although seabob shrimp (Xiphopenaeus kroyeri) has only been exploited since 1996 (LVV 2010), catch data (from 2002 until 2008) reveal drops despite increased efforts (LVV 2008).
Another concern regarding shrimp trawling in general is that the impact on populations of fish and other marine life, including juvenile shrimp, which are known to occur in bycatch, still remains largely unknown. The same holds for the impact of trawling on the nursery grounds of shrimp and fish. These impacts could indeed be important reasons for decreased catches.
Furthermore, the absence of a coast guard results in deficient law enforcement; even though licensed trawling vessels are tracked by VMS (Vessel Monitoring System), activities cannot be controlled at sea nor can illegal fishermen be kept out of Suriname waters.
In order to develop and implement proper management processes and plans, it is important to understand the history as well as the current status of the shrimp trawling industry. Examination of historical catch rates and spatial-temporal patterns in relation to population characteristics, along with considerations of reviewing catch limits, seasonal constraints, or establishment of Marine Protected Areas (no-fishing zones) for these species could secure sustainable harvesting in the future. Such measures can benefit all targeted shrimp species and thus ensure the sustainability and economic viability of the entire shrimp trawling industry in Suriname.
I have chosen to focus on seabob trawling largely because this industry received an eco-label in 2011 from the Marine Stewardship Council (DWT 2011). Outcomes of this thesis can serve as an important input for the evaluation of this eco- label. Research results can also serve as a basis for reviewing catch limits, or establishing seasonal constraints or Marine Protected Areas, thus supporting an ecosystem-based approach to management of the seabob trawling fishery in Suriname.

2. Objective(s):
 Construct a historical overview of the seabob shrimp trawling industry
 Study population characteristics of seabob, and investigate the way they occur in space and time
 Interpret the results ecologically and potentially make suggestions for fisheries management

3. Study area(s):
I will:
 Construct a historical overview of the seabob shrimp trawling industry by
◦ determining trend of catch (versus effort, number of licenses)
◦ describe trends within the seabob shrimp trawling fleet (numbers trawlers, types of boats and gear, number of licenses, companies involved, areas and methods of exploitation)
◦ compare historical and current biological data
 Study population characteristics of seabob, and investigate the way they occur in space and time
◦ analyze geographical data from the Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) to determine harvesting areas and produce seasonal (monthly) maps
◦ investigate relationship between harvested areas and population characteristics of the catch (total length, maturity, sex)
◦ investigate relationship between harvested areas and total catch of seabob shrimp per trip
 Interpret the results ecologically and potentially make suggestions for fisheries management

4. Method(s):
(include field and laboratory experiments, equipment and software to be used which have been bought by VLIR or is available in the Lab, and other operational costs)
I will:
 To construct a historical overview of the seabob trawling industry catch and effort data will be utilized to determine historical trends in the seabob shrimp catches; data on the number of licenses, companies, methods of exploitation, and the types of gear will be utilized to describe trends in the seabob shrimp industry; and historical and current biological data from different monitoring programs will be utilized to determine possible change or variation
 For the investigation of spatio-temporal patterns and population characteristics geographical data from the VMS (using GIS) and landings data will be utilized
 Use the historical overview and the investigation of spatio-temporal patterns and population characteristics as a basis for an ecological interpretation and to potentially make suggestions for fisheries management

5. Expectation(s):
Expected outputs are a thorough historical overview of the seabob shrimp industry and catches, and a description of the relationships between harvested areas, seasons and biological characteristics of the catch.
These outputs should lead to considerations of reviewing catch limits, or establishing seasonal or spatial restrictions to secure sustainable harvesting of seabob shrimp in the future.

 

Subject : Aquatic macro-invertebrates as indicators for pollution in Suriname

Student:

Keywords : Indicators, Aquatic invertebrates, Pollution
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Dr. Paul Ouboter
Co-supervisor : Prof. Dr. Jan Mol
(if applicable)
Tutor :
(if applicable)

Description of the research

1. Problem description:
Aquatic macro-invertebrates are widely used as indicator species for pollution of aquatic ecosystems in developed countries. In Suriname there is limited experience with one species of shrimp. This organism is not readily available in all seasons and all localities. It is therefore important to extent the choices available for toxicity testing. Testing of other invertebrates under various pollutants is needed to appreciate their value as indicators.

2. Objective(s):
Testing of the reaction of different species of macro-invertebrates to various pollutants

3. Study area(s):
Test will be performed in the laboratory. Macro-invertebrate specimens will be obtained from different locations.

4. Method(s):
Macro-invertebrates will be sampled at localities without any known pollution and will be acclimatized in large containers in the laboratory. Tests will be performed in smaller containers and will follow US EPA methodology for Aquatic Toxicity Biomonitoring tests (ATB tests). Pollutants to be tested may include mercury, "turbidity", pesticides and caustic soda. Within VLIR proj. 5 water quality measurement equipment is purchased that will be used during the tests. Testing containers are available at the CMO laboratory. The logistics to sample macro-invertebrates and chemicals to be used will involve some costs.

5. Expectation(s):
Some additional organisms that may be used as indicators in ATB tests and in the field as a warning system for increasing pollution.

6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
CMO occasionally carries out ATB tests and developed the pencil fish and glass shrimp as approved testing organisms for certain pollutants.


7. Link to SMNR courses:
The use of biodiversity as indicators for human disturbances, including pollution, is a subject in the course Biodiversity Conservation.


Subject : Explaining high mercury levels in undisturbed Central and Western Suriname.

Student:

Keywords : Mercury, Central Suriname, Western Suriname
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Dr. Paul Ouboter
Co-supervisor :
(if applicable)
Tutor :
(if applicable)

Description of the research

1. Problem description:
Small-scale gold mining results in serious pollution of aquatic ecosystems. Measurement of background levels resulted in unexpected high mercury levels found in undisturbed Central and Western Suriname. It is hypothesized that these levels are anthropogenic and that mercury was transported to the west by the NE trade winds. Some proof is provided by the mercury levels found so far in predicted low level areas. Additional proof may be acquired from core samples in floodplains. If the mercury in Central and Western Suriname is anthropogenic, levels in core samples are expected to decrease with depth (until a certain depth is reached). Knowledge about the origin of the mercury in Central and Western Suriname has consequences for measures to be taken in the regulation of the small-scale gold mining and for dietary advice to be given to local communities to prevent high take-up levels.

2. Objective(s):
Come closer to explaining high mercury levels in aquatic ecosystems in Central and Western Suriname.

3. Study area(s):
Lower Coppename River, Lower Nickerie River


4. Method(s):
Along sections of the Lower Coppename River and Lower Nickerie River floodplain areas will be identified using CBL maps and field visits. Core samples will be collected with a dedicated core sampler to a depth of 50-75 cm. Core samples will be transported to the laboratory on ice. In the laboratory 2 cm sections, 5 cm apart will be isolated, air dried, crushed, destructed with strong acids and analysed for mercury using atomic cold vapor absorption.

5. Expectation(s):
Support or rejection for the hypothesis of an anthropogenic origin of mercury in aquatic ecosystems in undisturbed Central and Western Suriname.

6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
Mercury pollution research is the focus area of research carried out by CMO.


7. Link to SMNR courses:
Mercury as a pollutant and threat to biodiversity will be treated during the course "Biodiversity Conservation". In addition it may be part of the courses "Environmental pollution and sanitation" and "Water resources management".

 

Subject : Impact of climate change on forest and savanna biodiversity

Student:

Keywords : Climate change, Biodiversity, Impacts
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Dr. Paul Ouboter
Co-supervisor :
(if applicable)
Tutor :
(if applicable)

Description of the research

1. Problem description:
Climate change is likely to have severe impacts in the tropics. Although general ideas on the impact on biodiversity have been developed, more specific impacts may be analyzed using distribution modeling. Changes in temperature and humidity are likely to have different impacts on lowland rainforest species than on mountain species or savanna species. Impacts on a selected number of species representing these groups may be investigated to develop a general idea on the effects climate change may have on Surinamese biodiversity.

2. Objective(s):
Develop a hypothesis on the impacts climate change may have on Surinamese biodiversity

3. Study area(s):
Suriname (no field work required)

4. Method(s):
Based on existing distribution data present at the NZCS or Herbarium and available on the internet (e.g. GBIF) the changes in distribution of several lowland forest, savanna and mountain species will be modeled using DIVA-GIS software that includes climate data. Expected changes in climate will be based on published literature.

5. Expectation(s):
A prediction of the impacts of climate change on biodiversity of Suriname.

6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
NZCS has several monitoring projects going on (also in VLIR project 5) that are intended to be long-term and that may register effects of climate change in the long run. The description of distributions is a classic part of the scientific work of NZCS and the Herbarium. Distribution modeling is a newer tool, that can proof to be very useful to predict impacts before we can actually see it in our monitoring results.

7. Link to SMNR courses:
In the course Biodiversity Conservation climate change will be treated as one of the threats to biodiversity.



Subject : Impact of illegal activities (gold mining, hunting and logging) at Brownsberg Nature Park on mammal communities

Keywords : Gold mining, hunting, logging, mammals, Brownsberg
(max. 5)
Supervisor : Dr. Paul Ouboter
Co-supervisor :
(if applicable)
Tutor :
(if applicable)

Description of the research
(give a short description of each paragraph, in total up to 2-A4 pages)

1. Problem description: Brownsberg Nature Park is a protected area since 1969. Illegal hunting and logging has occurred since its establishment, but has increased with the illegal intrusion of gold miners in the area since 1985. Gold mining is mainly confined to the larger creek valleys at the foot of the mountain, but illegal hunters are sometimes seen all the up the plateau (500m altitude). Hunting is mostly focused on mammals. The impact of these illegal activities on mammal populations is unknown.

2. Objective(s): Investigate the impact of illegal activities (gold mining, hunting and logging) on mammal communities.


3. Study area(s): Brownsberg Nature Park.

4. Method(s): A comparison will be made between an area close to the gold mining areas, and areas at the plateau. The plateau is relatively far away from the gold mining areas and illegal activities here are rare. The impact of illegal activities will be determined by comparing the presence, abundance and community composition of mammal species in the two areas. In addition indirect indicators of disturbance, like a change in diurnal/nocturnal activity, will be evaluated. For terrestrial mammals observations will be made with trapping cameras. Arboreal mammals, especially monkeys, will be observed directly using line transects. If possible, hunting pressure will also be evaluated indirectly by quantifying uneaten fruits fallen from certain fruit trees. These fruits remaining untouched on the forest floor under the trees are an indication for high hunting pressure, while fruits being removed or partly eaten indicate the presence of large rodents (agouti and paca), armadillos, deer and peccaries.
(include field and laboratory experiments, equipment and software to be used which have been bought by VLIR or is available in the Lab, and other operational costs)


5. Expectation(s): An indication of the impact of illegal activities (gold mining, hunting and logging) on mammal communities. This may result in the identifications

 

Other topics


Subject: Allocation of revenues of extraction of natural resources to scientific research and education.

Student: Adjodia, N.

Keywords: Natural resource exploitation; government; investment; scientific research and education

Supervisor : Prof. S. Naipal
Co-supervisor : Dr. Ir. Stijn Speelman

1. Problem description:
Natural resource extraction is a profitable activity. Although today extractors are already paying taxes, the utilization by government of this income source is mostly not transparent. Several countries therefore have introduced a system whereby part of the profits of extraction is set aside for investment in education and scientific research. Based on local expert knowledge, this thesis investigates the arguments pro and contra of such a system in Suriname and proposes how the systems should optimally look like.

2. Objective(s):
The objective of this study is to stimulate stakeholders and experts into developing a founded system for Suriname where our resources are used for national development and progress. In this way international investors will be accommodated more in order to increase the revenues for Suriname and the local population.

3. Study area(s): Suriname

4. Method(s):
First research will be done on the topic by studying the system used in other countries, if possible also in developing countries. After literature review and research an initial situation and certain statements will be defined. To gain input stakeholders and experts will be approached. During in depth interviews the statements will be presented. The intake form per expert/stakeholder will contain general questions but also question which are focused on the discipline of the expert/stakeholder. Thus general and specific information and input will be obtained.
Then the information is processed and if necessary an adjustment/review can be done on the statements.
This will be presented to the stakeholders and experts during joint meetings where they can exchange ideas on the subject.
Eventually this will lead to a good overview of the pros and contras about a system for Suriname where part of the revenues of extraction of Natural Resources is allocated for scientific research and education.

5. Expectation(s):
Gain sufficient knowledge to further explore and design a system for Suriname where part of the revenues out of extraction of natural resources can be allocated for scientific research and education.

6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:

7. Link to SMNR courses:
Economy and Valuation of Natural Resources


Subject : A measurement system for methane emission of flooded rice cultivation

Student: P. Sanchit

Keywords : Climatology, Statistics

Supervisor : L. Ori PhD.


Description of the research

1. Problem description:
The leading greenhouse gases (GHG's) include carbon dioxide, halocarbons, nitrous oxide, and methane. Carbon dioxide is the most important greenhouse gas, but methane is 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas. In wetland rice soils, flooding a field cuts off the oxygen supply from the atmosphere, resulting in anaerobic fermentation of soil organic matter. Methane, a major end product of anaerobic fermentation, is released from submerged soils to the atmosphere through the roots and stems of rice plants.
Currently methane emission is not measured in Suriname. In addition it is not known what method can be successfully used for methane emission measurements on flooded rice in Suriname. Currently rice cultivation includes about 52.000 hectares of land. The Surinamese government has planned to bring rice cultivation up to 150.000 hectares. The resulting increase in methane emission will potentially have a significant contribution on climate change.

2. Objective(s):
a. To develop a methane measurement system for flooded rice conditions in
Suriname.
b. To model the contribution of methane emission from flooded rice on climate
change.

3. Study area(s): Nickerie (Suriname)

4. Method(s):
Literature study, measurements in the field, modeling of methane emission from flooded rice.

5. Expectation(s):
- Development of a method that can be successfully used for measurement of
methane emission from flooded rice cultivation in Suriname.
- The student has gained knowledge in impact of methane emission from
flooded rice on climate change.

6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:

7. Link to SMNR courses: Climatology and Hydrology, Applied Statistics and Data modeling.

 

Subject : Developing a framework for the sustainable management of Suriname's genetic resources

Student: S. Soetosenojo

Keywords : Biodiversity, policy, legislation, access and benefit sharing

Description of the research

1. Problem description:
Genetic resources (from plants, animals and micro-organisms) are used for a variety of purposes, ranging from basic research to the development of products in varying sectors, such as pharmacy, cosmetics, horticulture and biotechnology. (UNCBD-Secretariat, 6 June 2011). After six years of negotiations, the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization was adopted at the 10th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity on 29 October 2010. The Nagoya Protocol will create legal certainty and transparency for both providers and users of genetic resources by establishing more predictable conditions for access to genetic resources and helping to ensure benefit-sharing when genetic resources leave the contracting party providing the genetic resources (UNCBD-Secretariat, 6 June 2011). Suriname has a rich biodiversity: the country is not only very diverse in terms of ecosystems and habitats, but also very rich in species diversity. If we were to compare the number of species to the land area, the country has about 7.9% of the world's bird species and almost 5% of the world's mammal species. (Ministerie van Arbeid, Technologische Ontwikkeling en Milieu, August 2009) Although genetic diversity has hardly been investigated in Suriname, one can safely assume that there is a great potential for high genetic diversity due to species richness and ecosystem diversity. With these genetic resources, the country can provide ample basic research opportunities and also opportunities in product development in many industrial and chemical sectors. Without proper policy and regulation many of these opportunities will be lost to Suriname and the world, but more importantly many (financial and social) benefits arising from these opportunities will be lost to the country. Thus, how can Suriname regulate the access to its genetic resources and also advance the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the utilization of these genetic resources? And also, how will the Nagoya Protocol provide effective means in the sustainable management of Suriname's genetic resources?

2. Objective(s):
 Give a brief history of the development of the international processes regarding access to genetic resources and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from their utilization including the scope and the objectives of the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization.
 Assess the current policy and legal framework on the issue of ‘Access and Benefit Sharing' (ABS) in Suriname with the emphasis on its strengths, weaknesses and opportunities.
 Determine the pros and contras for Suriname regarding the Nagoya Protocol and identify how this Protocol can assist and strengthen the efforts in the effective management of the country's genetic resources.
 Determine the role of Indigenous, Maroon and other local communities in the management of genetic resources and assess their Benefit Sharing Models.
 Determine the role of AdeK University in the management and development of the country's genetic resources.
 Make recommendations for a Benefit Sharing Model for the country.

3. Study area(s):
Management of biodiversity and genetic resources, policy and legislation regarding biodiversity and genetic resources management.

4. Method(s):
 Literature study: access needed to scientific, legal and policy journals and related documents.
 Interviews and consultations with government officials, business sector, researchers, specialists and representatives of the Indigenous, Maroon and other local communities.

5. Expectation(s):
 Development of an advisory proposal for ratification of the Nagoya Protocol
 Development of a Policy note containing principles and measures for mainstreaming ABS regime in national development programs
 Development of a Policy note containing principles for ABS legislation.

6. Link to current research at AdeKUS:
Regulating the access to and sharing of the benefits arising from the use of genetic resources should be considered as an integral part of biodiversity conservation and sustainable development.

7. Link to SMNR courses:
Biodiversity conservation, Nature conservation management, Environmental law, Sustainable development

 

Student: Bhaggoe, D.
Keywords : Energy, energy policy, Energy and management, Energy policy framework
Supervisor : Dr. Ir. Viren Ajodhia

Description of the research
1. Problem description:
The main goal of any country, Suriname included, is to promote social and economic development. This relates to the uplifting of the welfare of the people through measures taken in accordance with agreed principles and strategies. Citizens and communities of any Country do not exist in a vacuum but within a framework of government policies, laws and institutions. Energy is an important element in the promotion of economic development. Access to
energy helps to develop more efficient production technologies and encourage  economic growth and prosperity. At this point of time Suriname has no Energy Policy in place. Other countries like Norway and United States but also Caribbean countries such as Bermuda and Barbados do have an energy policy implemented. Their Energy Policy is a coherent set of decisions with a common long-term objective (or objectives) affecting or relevant to the energy sector.
An energy policy reflects what choices /decisions a nation is making from a number of alternatives to address particular energy related problems.
An Energy Policy recognizes the importance of the role of energy in the national economy and provides guidelines to handle the impact on the increasing economic activities, technological development, energy prices, and energy supply and demand trends. It is generally accepted that an Energy policy provides a means to better exploit the energy resources in the country and develop optimal strategies for energy within the context of the national economy.
The absence of an Energy Policy for Suriname results in the absence of a clear policy framework and hence potentially result in ad hoc decision-making with respect to energy, which is a crucial input to the economy. Therefore the lack of an Energy Policy can be considered an important impediment in achieving further economic development in Suriname.

2. Objective(s):
The starting point for this thesis is the current absence of an Energy Policy for Suriname. In this respect, this thesis aims to contribute to the development of an
Energy Policy for Suriname. This will be achieved by identifying the building blocks of such an energy policy and developing these within the context of the Suriname situation. The final outcome of this project will be an outline for an Energy Policy for Suriname that can be used as a starting point for policy developers. The outline will clearly indicate the elements to be contained in the policy and an assessment of the possible choices for Suriname to make as well as recommendations based on this research. In order to reach such an analysis this thesis will be based on the following questions:
- What is the role of Energy for the development of Suriname?
- What are the building blocks for an Energy policy?
- In what way should these building blocks be developed in the context of
Suriname?

3. Study area(s): Suriname
- Energy entails the electricity and transportation sectors
- The study will exclude rural electrification (interior of Suriname)

4. Method(s):
- Literature study: internet, books, articles, etc
- Review of energy policies in other countries (St Lucia, United States, Tanzania, Norway, etc.)
- Field research: interviews with employees of: Ministry of Natural Resources, Ministry of Regional Development, CEO Staatsolie, CEO Energybedrijven
Suriname (EBS), etc.
- Visit to the Energy Company, Staatsolie Suriname NV

5. Expectation(s):
- The final thesis will provide clear insight of the energy situation of Suriname and the bottle necks in utilizing energy as a main input for economic development
- Creating the building blocks for a suitable Energy Policy of Suriname that can act as a starting point for developing and implementing such a policy.

6. Link to SMNR courses:
Energy Management, Renewable Energy Systems, Electrical Energy Technology, Economic and valuation of natural Resources, Sustainable Development, Project Management

 
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